Matthews Bark – “iPhone App Offers Breach Law Guide”

Source : Bank Info Security
By : Eric Chabrow
Category : Matthews Bark – Criminal-Defense-Attorney

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A new, free iPhone app is designed to help organizations navigate 46 state data breach notification laws as well as federal statutes, such as HIPAA, attorney Scott Vernick says. Vernick, a partner at the law firm Fox Rothschild whose practice includes privacy and data security law, coordinated the development of the app, known as Data Breach 411. “We wanted to put something at people’s fingertips so that they could readily, at a minimum, look at the 46 different breach notification statutes and get a sense of what their reporting obligations were,” Vernick says in an interview with Information Security Media Group. The free app can be downloaded from iTunes. Vernick says the firm will likely eventually create an Android version.

Among the app’s features:

An alphabetical listing of the 46 states with data breach laws, with links to relevant notification statutes; Links to federal breach notification rules and other relevant information related to the loss or theft of protected health information; and Links to credit agencies and credit monitoring services and the Federal Trade Commission website. The app also offers a section on the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act as well as infor-mation regarding the mining of data on minors. In the interview, Vernick describes the features of Data Breach 411, discusses the environment that created the need for the app and explains how the app will be updated and upgraded. Vernick is a commercial litigator who focuses on technology, intellectual property, health care, privacy and data security law. He regularly counsels multi-national and mid-sized businesses on how to mitigate risk and overcome the challenges posed by the multitude of state and federal laws and regulations dealing with IT security, privacy and data breach notification.

Source : bankinfosecurity.com/interviews/iphone-app-offers-breach-law-guide-i-2163

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Matthews Bark – “Google Buys Artificial Intelligence Start-Up DeepMind”

Source : USA Today
By : Alistair Barr
Category : Matthews Bark – Criminal-Defense-Attorney

Matthews R Bark- Criminal-Defense-Attorney
Matthews R Bark- Criminal-Defense-Attorney

Google reportedly paid more than $400 million for DeepMind, which would make it the company’s largest European acquisition so far. Google has acquired London-based start-up DeepMind to expand further into the field of artificial intelligence. DeepMind describes itself as a “cutting-edge artificial intelligence company.” It combines techniques from machine learning and systems neuroscience to build powerful general-purpose learning algorithms. The company was founded by Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman. Its first commercial applications are in simulations, e-commerce and games. DeepMind investors include Founders Fund, the venture capital firm run by former PayPal executive Peter Thiel, and Horizons Ventures, headed by Li Ka-shing, one of the richest people in the world.

Google reportedly paid more than $400 million for DeepMind, which would make it the company’s largest European acquisition so far. The company also reportedly beat Facebook to the deal. Artificial intelligence, or AI, is a branch of computer science that aims to make computers behave more like humans, with capabilities such as reasoning, learning and planning. Google already uses this type of technology for many projects, such as its expanding language-translation services. Google spokesman Tim Drinan confirmed the acquisition, but declined to comment further Monday. An e-mail sent to DeepMind seeking comment was not returned.

Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin have been focused on AI for at least a decade. Back in 2004, as the company was going public, the executives were already thinking about how Google search could be improved through this technology. At that time, Page said Google search would be “included in people’s brains,” according to Steven Levy’s 2011 book about the company, In the Plex. “When you think about something and don’t really know much about it, you will automatically get information,” Page explained. Brin saw Google as a way to “augment your brain … you can have computers that pay attention to what’s going on around them and suggest useful information.”

“Eventually, you’ll have the implant, where if you think about a fact, it will just tell you that answer,” Page added in the book. DeepMind published a study in December that claimed to show the firm’s AI technology learning to play some Atari computer games better than expert human gamers. DeepMind’s technology performed better than humans on Breakout, Enduro and Pong, and it achieved “close to human performance” on Beamrider, according to the research paper. The technology was far behind human performance when playing Q*bert, Seaquest and Space Invaders, “because they require the network to find a strategy that extends over long time scales,” the paper said.

Source : usatoday.com/story/tech/2014/01/27/google-deepmind-artificial-intelligence/4943049/

Matthews Bark – Why You Don’t Want A Biglaw Firm To Handle Your Little Landlord-Tenant Case

Source      – abovethelaw.com/
By             – David Lat
Category – Matthews Bark

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Matthews Bark

The court will not countenance the gross overreaching evidenced under the facts and circumstances of this case in which the client is not even being billed for legal services. To move any court to put its imprimatur of approval on such practices is simply intolerable.

– Judge Frank Nervo, denying a Biglaw firm’s request for more than $126,000 in attorneys’ fees in a lawsuit over a $6,400 security deposit. Judge Nervo added that the firm spent “a grossly unnecessary amount of time” on simple tasks, including “research on the most basic and banal legal principles.”

(Which firm was on the receiving end of this benchslap? Find out after the jump, where we’ve posted the full opinion.)

The firm in question was Mayer Brown, which apparently made this foray into landlord/tenant law because one of the tenants, Thomas Clozel, is the son of Jean-Paul Clozel, a founder and CEO of Actelion, a Swiss biopharmaceutical company that’s a Mayer Brown client. The client wasn’t being billed, as noted by Judge Nervo, because the case was being handled as one of those “friend of the firm” matters.

I can’t really fault Mayer Brown here, since “friend of the firm” matters often require Biglaw attorneys to immerse themselves in areas of law that they know nothing about. I once worked on such a case, involving the high school disciplinary problems of a kid whose father was a titan of finance, even though neither I nor the partner I worked with knew anything about education law. Luckily we were able to resolve the matter to the family’s satisfaction (and they sent me a lovely case of wine for the holidays).

So next time your cousin wants your help getting back his security deposit, refer him to a knowledgeable residential real-estate litigator — unless your cousin is willing to pay you a six-figure sum.

Source – abovethelaw.com/2014/01/why-you-dont-want-a-biglaw-firm-to-handle-your-landlord-tenant-case/

Matthews Bark – From The Young Lawyers Division To The Senior Lawyers Division

Source     – americanbar.org/
By            – Press Release
Category – Matthews Bark

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After decades of commitment to the American Bar Association, Seth Rosner has been elected chair of the ABA Senior Lawyers Division. But focusing on professional pursuits would only tell part of his story.

Rosner, a Saratoga Springs, N.Y.-based practitioner specializing in business law, legal ethics and professional responsibility, was admitted to practice in 1955, the same year he received his JD degree from Columbia Law School. He began his service to the ABA in 1964 as a delegate from the New York City Bar to the Young Lawyers Division. He went on to represent seven different constituencies in the House of Delegates, among many other ABA involvements.

Rosner, 83, has served a cumulative 45 years on ethics and professionalism committees of the ABA as well as other lawyer groups.

“While many academics, judges and practitioners have distinguished themselves in the field of legal ethics, only a handful can truly claim to have contributed meaningfully to the overarching concepts of professionalism. Mr. Rosner is a leader of this very elite group,” ethics lawyer Diane Karpman of Beverly Hills, Calif., said when Rosner won the Michael Franck Professional Responsibility Award in 2009 from the ABA Center for Professional Responsibility.

In nominating Rosner for the Franck award, the late legal ethics expert Steven C. Krane wrote: “Seth has worked in the professionalism vineyards as a volunteer. His service in this area over a period of more than four decades may be unparalleled.”

Another Center for Professional Responsibility award, the Rosner & Rosner Young Lawyers Professionalism Award, was created and is funded by Seth Rosner in memory of his father and brother.

Rosner earned his LLM degree in comparative law from the New York University School of Law, where he was an adjunct faculty member for 29 years.

He is a founding trustee, past chairman and now chairman emeritus of the Board of Governors of the Josephson Institute of Ethics, which has conducted programs for more than 100,000 public officials, school administrators, military and police officers, journalists, corporate and nonprofit executives, and judges and lawyers.

Building on his experience racing sports cars as young man in California and France, Rosner serves as a trustee and officer of the Saratoga Automobile Museum. He has also served on the boards of Jewish Home Lifecare, Wesleyan University (his undergraduate alma mater) and the Leica Historical Society of America

Earlier in his life, Rosner worked on a ranch in Idaho, won squash racquets championships in New York City and won table tennis tournaments aboard trans-Atlantic ocean liners. During his three and half years of active duty in the Navy, Rosner was legal officer and an officer-of-the-deck on the USS Intrepid in the Atlantic. He writes verse and his photographs have appeared in national magazines and a book. Rosner presently sings bass in the Racing City Chorus, the men’s barbershop singers of Saratoga Springs.

 

Source – americanbar.org/news/abanews/aba-news-archives/2014/01/from_the_young_lawye.html

 

Matthews Bark – Google Unveils ‘Smart Contact Lens’ To Measure Glucose Levels

Source     – bbc.co.uk/
By            – Press Release
Category – Matthews Bark

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Matthews Bark

It uses a “tiny” wireless chip and a “miniaturised” glucose sensor embedded between two layers of lens material.

The firm said it is also working on integrating tiny LED lights that could light up to indicate that glucose levels have crossed certain thresholds.

But it added that “a lot more work” needed to be done to get the technology ready for everyday use.

“It’s still early days for this technology, but we’ve completed multiple clinical research studies which are helping to refine our prototype,” the firm said in a blogpost.

“We hope this could someday lead to a new way for people with diabetes to manage their disease.”

‘Exciting development’

Many global firms have been looking to expand in the wearable technology sector – seen by many as a key growth area in the coming years.

Various estimates have said the sector is expected to grow by between $10bn and $50bn (£6bn and £31bn) in the next five years.

Within the sector, many firms have been looking specifically at technology targeted at healthcare.

Google’s latest foray with the smart contact lens is aimed at a sector where consumer demand for such devices is expected to grow.

According to the International Diabetes Federation, one in ten people across the world’s population are forecast to have diabetes by 2035.

People suffering from the condition need to monitor their glucose levels regularly as sudden spikes or drops are dangerous. At present, the majority of them do so by testing drops of blood.

Google said it was testing a prototype of the lens that could “generate a reading once per second”.

“This is an exciting development for preventive healthcare industry,” Manoj Menon, managing director of consulting firm Frost & Sullivan told the BBC.

“It is likely to spur a range of other innovations towards miniaturizing technology and using it in wearable devices to help people monitor their bodies better.”

Open innovation?

Google said it was working with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to bring the product to mainstream use.

It added that it would look for partners “who are experts in bringing products like this to market”.

Google said it would work with these partners to develops apps aimed at making the measurements taken by the lens available to the wearer and their doctor.

Mr Menon said it was “commendable” that Google was willing to work with other partners even before the product was commercially ready.

“Their open innovation approach is going to help accelerate the development of this product and get it out to the market much faster,” he said.

Other firms have also been looking towards wearable products that help monitor the health of the wearer.

Earlier this month, a gadget called Sensible Baby was unveiled at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. It is a sensor put in an infant’s night clothes that tracks their temperature, orientation and movement.

It sounds a smartphone app alarm if it detects a problem.

Several smartwatches that can monitor data by studying key indicators such as the the wearer’s heart rate and temperature have also been launched.

Last year, Japanese firm Sony filed a patent for a ‘SmartWig’, with healthcare cited as one of its potential uses.

It said the wig could use a combination of sensors to help collect information such as temperature, pulse and blood pressure of the wearer.

Source – bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25771907

Matthews Bark – Top Court Will Look At Rules Encouraging Patent Infringement

Source      – blogs.wsj.com/
By             – Brent Kendall
Category – Matthews Bark

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The U.S. Supreme Court said Friday that it would consider whether to make it easier to hold companies liable for encouraging others to commit patent infringement.

The court agreed to hear an appeal by Internet services company Limelight Networks Inc.LLNW -4.11%, which is fighting a patent infringement lawsuit brought by larger rival Akamai Technologies Inc.AKAM -3.94%

A badly splintered federal appeals court ruled in 2012 that Akamai could proceed with allegations that Limelight encouraged its customers to infringe an Akamai patent involving a method for helping website owners manage online traffic efficiently.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, in a 6-5 decision, ruled Limelight would be liable if Akamai could prove that Limelight performed some actions outlined in the patent and then directed its customers to perform the remaining steps in the patent.

Limelight, which denied Akamai’s allegations, argued that a company shouldn’t be held liable for encouraging patent infringement unless some single party performs every step in the patent.

Akamai said the lower court’s ruling correctly closed a loophole that allowed companies to induce patent infringement without any penalty.

A host of technology companies, including Google Inc. , Cisco Systems Inc.CSCO -0.14% and Oracle Corp.ORCL -0.94%, urged the Supreme Court to hear the case.  They warned that the lower court ruling would dramatically expand patent-infringement liability for companies whose high-tech products could be used to facilitate patent infringement by others.

The Obama administration also urged the court to hear the case, voicing similar arguments.

The Supreme Court likely will hear oral arguments in April, with a decision expected by the end of June.

Source – blogs.wsj.com/law/2014/01/10/top-court-will-look-at-rules-encouraging-patent-infringement/

Matthews Bark – Mophie Space Pack Gives Your iPhone More Juice, Memory

Source      – techradar.com/
By              – Marc Flores 
Category – Matthews Bark 

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The mophie space pack is coming, and it’s the sort of product that had us thinking, “This is so obvious – why didn’t anyone do this sooner?” We’ve all known mophie for its excellent battery packs and battery cases, but with the space pack, we’re getting more storage space, too.

If your 16/32/64GB iPhone isn’t cutting it for you, you can add an additional 16GB or 32GB, plus 1,700mAh of juice to your iPhone 5 or 5S. And the big news for mophie is that it just got the Made for iPhone certification from Apple, too, hence the big CES 2014 announcement.

The mophie space pack is almost exactly like the mophie juice pack air, except it’s 3mm longer and it features the new “Space” hardware inside that works in conjunction with mophie’s Space iOS app.

You’ll feel right at home with the Space app since it’s designed to look and function like a native iOS 7 app. From there, you can access your files, photos, videos and anything else you store within the mophie space pack.

You can also see your usage and available space via a pie chart or a line graph that looks like the iTunes usage graph. It’s really great and there is virtually no learning curve in using this thing if you’re already familiar with iOS 7 and iTunes.

One neat feature is the way file management is handled: you can transfer files between the iPhone and space pack, send files via e-mail, messaging, AirDrop, Dropbox and more from space pack, and you can arrange/delete/transfer files on the space pack via your computer.

Mophie gave us a quick demo of the Space app, and we were impressed with just how easy it is to use. We’re definitely looking forward to reviewing the mophie space pack next month. We were reminded again why we gave the mophie space pack a Best of CES 2014 award.

As far as the hardware goes, it will be familiar to any mophie user with the addition of a new feature for that silver button in the back. The button will allow you to use Space when you open up the app, and the reason for the button is so that it conserves memory and battery life when you’re not using Space. You just press the button again to activate it when you’re in the app.

We can’t stress enough just how useful the mophie space pack is, and why no one has thought to do this before. The downside is that it supports only the iPhone 5/5S right now, so if you’re a mophie user with a Galaxy device, you might have to wait a bit longer.

The mophie space pack will become available March 14 in 1,700 mAh 16GB and 32GB variants for $149.95 and $179.95, respectively, but you can pre-order them now from mophie.

Source – techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/mophie-space-pack-gives-your-iphone-more-juice-memory-1214050